IFP looks to NW for votes

2021-Oct-09   08:29

IFP looks to NW for votes
Inkatha Freedom Party (IFP) has taken its election campaign to the North West province, over 700 kilometres outside its traditional stronghold of Kwazulu-Natal.
Source: Thabang Morutloa/Newsnote

- Thabang Morutloa

Inkatha Freedom Party (IFP) has taken its election campaign to the North West province, over 700 kilometres outside its traditional stronghold of Kwazulu-Natal.

The party on Friday canvassed support in Mahikeng where it promised to improve service delivery, should it be voted into power come November local government elections.

IFP National Chairperson, Mziwenkosi Gwala, said his party will ensure accountability if elected to the local council.

“When you get into a house you clean the house. We need to clean the administration because that is where things are happening. We need to clean the administration and those involved in acts of corruption need to be arrested. For example, if you look at Mahikeng Local Municipality they took all the municipality’s monies to VBS Bank to invest for their own benefit instead of using the money for service delivery.

“We need to follow all those things so that we will be able to start a clean slate administration. We will also talk to the people in a manner that will actually satisfy them in terms of service delivery. We know that in this province water and sanitation is a challenge. So the IFP will bring changes with good leadership,” Gwala said.

However, residents had mixed feelings about the party’s visit.

Dolly Thulo said he lost hope in all political parties.

“I only vote because I have to vote. I don’t even know which political party to vote for because l have lost hope in all these political parties,” Thulo said.

Thandi Mashila said this will be her last vote if there are no changes.

“I’ve decided to vote again and see if there will be any changes. If there are no changes then this will be the last time I cast my vote,” said Mashila.

Itshekeng Itshekeng only goes to the voting station to confirm that his name still appears on the voters roll.

“I just go to the voting station to check my name in the voters roll, but I’m not going to vote. I seriously feel that things were much better during the apartheid regime. We voted the ANC into power in 1994 with the hope that it will bring services to us and improve our lives. But we continue to live in poverty. I’m approaching my 60s. Since I graduated from manpower [a TVET college under the former Bophuthatswana government] I have not been employed. So I don’t see the importance of voting,” Itshekeng said.

Meanwhile, IPF said it will be contesting in two municipal districts of the North West: Ngaka Modiri Molema and Bojanala.

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